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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 644 (some duplicates have been removed)
educator defined my professional path. when i recalled this dismissal in those two sentences, i am reminded of the thing that (inaudible) in the intervening years. however these 12 words are not only enough to express the challenges that my team and i have faced, but they stand for our triumphs as well. despite a skeptical and hostile environment, we survived. starting in the 80s with just 25 students started as the first chinese public school opened in san francisco in 1985. as i remember, i remember the quote, which would you teach chinese to them? i try to recall that and to what my colleague said has grown from a small pocket of multi-ethnic students to a student body comprised of many diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. i try to recall how hard we fought, administrator and parents and students and teachers alike. and what we each sacrificed to be be where -- to be where we are today. today i am humbled by my students who excel in two languages and our students are asked to demonstrate their chinese skills. today our graduates go to beijing, china to build bridges using their skills. to
in helping us better understand the link between education and poverty. we all know there is a link between education and poverty, but jonathan, give me the top line of this new book, fire in the ashes, and the 25 years you spent with children and a link to poverty. >> cornell always gets my blood boiling because i agree with him so deeply. i was a young teacher in boston and a white guy living in the black community, and the black ministers did me an honor of letting me stand by his side the first time he came to preach in boston common, and his words changed my life forever. that is when i turned my back on an academic life and decided to teach fourth graders in our poorest neighborhoods. i get so angry on his birthday or on martin luther king day -- i heard politicians who turned their back totally on every single thing he lived and died for, never lifted a finger to bring an end to apartheid in schooling, which is now at a higher rate than it was the year he died, and they say, "i, too, had a dream." you cannot play games with the dreams of our prophets. dr. king did not say he had a dr
tend to be older men, educated in a certain way that didn't study such matters and most historians were not educated in the matter office -- matters of the heart and the hearth. but by studying the first ladies -- the first think thomas jefferson did after spending 1 days cooped up in a loft outside of philadelphia, writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did was he went shopping for martha, his wife. he was pregnant and had had a miscarriage, and he bought her some gloves. then he begged off from serving for the rest of the summer so he could go home to be with his wife. every within -- every interof -- every winter of the revolutionary war, there was martha washington. i propose washington's closer advisor was alexander hamilton, and one chapter talks about hamilton's history of womanizing, bill clinton was not the first and was not the worst when it comes to misbehavior and high office. there's a long history. itot spitzer, arnold schwarzenegger, david petraeus, had nothing on alexander hamilton. if you read letters written by martha washington during those winter
.7% of national income for jobs, training, education, for all the infrastructure, the environment, climate, technology, and forgetting who government? this is the hard truth, and what is likely to happen is to solidify this, because no one is speaking out for the government. we are talking about protecting entitlements. we are squeezing to nothing. the top do not pay. they have been given every way to get their money out tax-free, and it is trillions of dollars that have been lost in addition to what has been wasted in the censored wars. >> if i can get some quick response, jeffrey sachs was saying a while ago there is a bipartisan consensus that the poor do not matter, so they end up being more invisible. what is troubling for so many of us, you talk about a guy like lyndon johnson who made it very clear he knew he was writing off the south for the next 30 or 40 years by pushing the kinds of programs he pushed, the war on poverty. let me ask you a question i was going to ask the congress wouldn't -- the congresswoman. i will ask you, have the democrats abandoned for people -- poor people?
that. we need to first get to be fair. if someone's got a dollar and he's educated and he should be in the slot or should be voted for, he should be able to. forget about the billions that people have getting themselves into office. i think it's terrible. host: all right, robert. we're going to leave it there. we're going to take a break from our discussion regarding term limits for elected officials and talk about a decision that was handed down by the federal court of appeals yesterday. to talk to us about that, we're going to bring in josh hicks of the "the washington post," the federal blogger. welcome to the "washington journal." guest: thanks for having me. host: the lead in this morning's "the washington post," your paper, says boil boil officials -- says obama officials ruled in power, courts cut power of appointment, judges limit action during senate recesses. the president exceeded his constitutional authority by making appointments when the senate was on a break last year, a federal appeals court ruled friday the court's broad ruling would sharply limited power that pr
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
for the politician who is going to help them get their kid a better education or get their mother in a better situation for elder care facility. >> gavin: the frustration for me is you've got extraordinary people. i really believe this in politics who are trapped by an extraordinarily bad system you saw this with president obama who said i can't stand these super pacs but realized you cannot unilaterally disarm if you're in this game, and he would be crushed and rolled over. how do we reconcile that. good people trapped in a bad system. how do we ultimately manifest that. >> well, i think you need someone who breakaway and who will understand, and i believe this to be true, if they say i will not take super pac money that the people who hate the campaign finance system will come to them and say this is a different politician. >> gavin: yeah. >> and that is a tough choice. i appreciate that, but i do believe, in fact that in this day and age where the issue of money and politics is just pervasive and ordinary every day conversation that a candidate could be quite successful in this regard. >>
to dozens of schools where there were dramatic gains that were maintained. >> "the education of michelle rhee." >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, supporting instigive porting and enterprise journalism. additional funding for this program is provided by: >> michelle rhee's journey to national prominence began in 2007. washington dc had just inaugurated a new mayor, adrian fenty. he had won a landslide election and promised to fix the district's abysmal school system. >> the lack of real opportunity for young people drives our unemployment rate, it drives our crime rate, and we can't have that. this is the nation's capitol o
, deeply grounded in our education and how it has prepared us as women and the leaders and the fact that your mom was very much an activist in the movement, and they need to know about it. i'm working on the book, this book. i said well, can i help you, can i get it published and that is how this journey began. >> bernice, when did your mother began her activism? she was born in marion alabama? >> i ron ackley if you study history, three of the leading movement, ralph abernathy and my father all have lives in alabama. how ironic is that. my mother didn't know one leader after that. she no one was much younger but they didn't know, you know, that kind of stuff and it just brought it all together. and so, growing up there in rural alabama with a father who was an entrepreneur early on and he called lumber and he did open an assault mel by a white gentleman. the father's determination to stand up to justice and continue to move to really influenced her and that produced a lot of the leaders in the nation. missionaries came and educated the reactive and why am i here driven by the fact
what would you invest in?" . i would invest in education and we're not investing in the future of the children and the in the country and the global future of our world and i agree absolutely with everything you said. we're short changing our kids and not giving teachers the resources. there is mold in the teacher's work room. if i worked in the building that many children go to school in i wouldn't go to work either and in answer to your question there is a priority here about education that's not quite right. >> and while we're earmarking money i would totally support that and i feel that we should train teachers in digital media. you can't teach cooking out a kitchen, so we need to bring digital media into the classroom so people can practice in the environments they're in all the time outside of school. >> and i would say that having listened to the word "media literacy" as far as back when i was carrying 3-inch quarter cassettes years ago and it was a great job. it really was. to teach media and digital literacy out of context is a fool's error and we have the boring
, gay-rights, and did briefly mention education. >> no single person can trade of the single math and science teachers read for the future. we must harness new ideas to revamp the tax code and reform our schools and empower citizens with the skills they need to work harder and reach higher. lou: he did not actually say education but he did mention the word reform. he wants to change everything. if you believe the data the federal education department puts out you may think there is no need it only reflected the reality. the education department is a giddy that shows high-school graduation rate is 78-point to%. 70-point to% that is a 35 year, and not a high but the best this report, think about it. 21% is not getting it done. the education department also notes, about this, the national dropout rate is 3 percent overall down from 4% last year. are you kidding me? if only 78.2% are getting it done how does that end up at 3%? new mask? federal math? political math. is a joke not funny brought to by the department of education. a report from a nonprofit group last year told the differ
you. thank you. >> where do began. no matter whether you know about education or not, let's turn to the banking world. investing in very young children is the best investment you can make. it has the greatest return on investment, and we know that because the first three years of life for the most important for cognitive, social, and emotional development. you are only two years old ones. that is the most significant window of time, and i think there must be an incident or a toddler in here, which brings me to the next point, yes we have class warfare, but it is unusual class warfare. those who are poor are completely left out. it is a bipartisan effort to keep people who are pouring out of the national dialogue. that is why i started witness to hunter, which is working to be able to provide direction testimony on their experiences on raising children in poverty, and i will tell you there are so many conversations. the fact people have been silent for so many years, that is a mass of a trail. the first thing the women who are poor will tell you is that poverty is solvable. they e
of the schoolkill center and peggy executive director of west harlem environmental education. so nice to have all of you at the table. folks who follow the story know the second part of the story is that the president is deposed by a military coup last year in 2012. the thing i love and hate about that story is yep, that's exactly the problem. we can't make big, sustainable international green policy because we are fighting, literally fighting over islands sinking into the ocean. here, too, we are continuing to fight over all these policy questions and politics questions and missing the big story, the big story that is affecting all of us. is there any way to get us refocused on international inner generational, sustainable and international? >> climate change. we all have skin and neck in it. polls show 49% of americans believe that climate change is occurring and that people have caused it. 24% say it's climate change, but not from people. i'm not sure what science people are waiting for at this point. there's so much more science in and more coming in all the time. none theless, it was great t
that our education and how it prepared us as women to be leaders and the fact that your mom was very much an activist involved in the peace movement and they need to know about her. and i said i'm working on this book. i said can i help you? get it published? this is how the journey began. >> host: bernice king your mother come to how active bushy and when did she begin her activism? was born in marion alabama? >> guest: ironically if you study history three of the leading persons in the movement ralph abernathy and my father i'll had wives from carrie county alabama. how ironic is that and mom did not know of one data abernathy. when the movement started they didn't know about them marrying different men in all of that kind of stuff and have brought it all together. and so growing up there in rural alabama with the father who was an entrepreneur or entrepreneur or leon and unheard of as an african-american had his own truck. he hauled lumber. he did open a sawmill and it was burned down by a white gentleman he hired. he would not let that stop them. implements a separate father's determi
to balance california's budget. he also pushed for his priorities including education and regulatory reform. now, john, how would you rate his speech and what left the biggest impressions on you? >> well, you know, rating the speech, a speech from jerry brown is really tough to do because it's unlike any other speech you get from any other governor. how many governors go from the book of genesis to "the little engine that could" in one 25-minute speech? this was a vintage jerry brown speech. i think really what you saw here was a little bit of the governor running a victory lap. proposition 30 passed. temporary taxes passed. the budget looks a lot better. i think this was the governor's chance to pivot, to pivot to talking about what makes california great, how we get them back on track. don't worry, we're getting there. so i took this as a real optimistic speech with a lot of details, a lot of brown history facts. and really a message i think not only to the legislature but to the public of, like, i'm watching it. we're going to be careful, but we're going to move forward. >> and, john, yo
structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is educated to their full potential? i know helping the state economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. but can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed , and buffalo, and syracuse, and albany. i know women have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historical. i know it is difficult. if it can you imagines what the society could achieve when our women fully participate as equal partners in ev
of educating our public and all the other kids and families in our city. this is a way of our quality of life, we cannot accept human trafficking. part of the way to do that is to have this be part of the kids education, and push strongly. the collaborative this year, allow the youth of san francisco to enter in a poster contest to provide artistic ability to the messaging of this really important movement. the 2013 poster contest winners i get to announce. i will begin with third-place winners. the third-place winner, first one eighth-grade student, from james brannan middle school. shelley lu (sounds like) apl(applause) also an eighth-grade student from james dunham as well, stella lee. thank you. apl(applause) (applause) to be an eighth-grader. the collaborative has chosen for the second place at 12 greater, from abraham lincoln high school. stephanie chung (applause) and then we have a number of first place winners. i'm sure this is all about collaboration, talking about it, what it means absorbing the purpose and working together. the first place poster altogether for all of us
of the mlk research and education institute at stanford. he joins us tonight from colorado. always good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you. tavis: at the king day to you. what do you make of the fact that, on this day, we do not just celebrate the legacy and life of dr. king, but the first african-american president inaugurated for the second time? >> there is so much to celebrate on this day and so much to remember about the part of king's dream that has not been fulfilled. particularly the issue of poverty. there are so many things that make us thankful that the civil- rights reforms were achieved. i think it is important, particularly on this day, to remember that, if king were around, he would be pushing us to deal with that have -- that pestering issue of poverty. tavis: why is it that you think that, with all the evidence supporting the notion that pozner -- the poverty is threatening our democracy, it is a matter of national security, one out of two americans are either in or near poverty, the younger you are, the more likely you are to be in poverty, these
those in the chat room today, parents, educators and a lot of questions about how the vice president's personal views on gun ownership jived with their hopes of curbing gun vie lechbls he answered that one right away. >> and so my view is that it is totally a guarantee not negotiable that i'm able to own a weapon for sporting purposes as well as my own protection. but there should be rational limits on the type of weapon i can own. >> reporter: as for guns in schools, he could see putting an officer in a school, armed or unarmed, depending how parents and teachers feel. mr. bind also went on to say woe support researcher into whether or not video games contribute to violent breeze i have or. the chat lasted a little more than half an hour. diane? >> thanks a lot, scott. >>> it is official today, outgoing defense secretary leon panetta lifted the ban on women serving in combat positions. the move comes after a decade of war in afghanistan and iraq. more than 1,000 women were injured, 150 killed in those wars. the change is scheduled to go into effect by march 15th h the ban had been i
of linking education with worse force development. making the united states more economically competitive by investing in community colleges, by improving our education system and linking that with the business sector. if he can do that he can lead four years from now with a america with a better economy and much more well positioned for prosperity. >> i have to check in with the reporters around town. brooke baldwin. can you hear me? >> reporter: you hear correctly. i can barely hear myself speak. i'm a southern girl. it's my perfect place. they're playing a very significant song right now. this is simple plman. i was talking to them backstage. they say this is the one song they sing. they sing at concerts like this all the time. we have heroes in the room. our men and women in military. many of them in wheelchairs to my right who have made it out here. they are trying to move forward. the guys in the band say the song just resonates. neez men a these men and women are simple men and women. yourself missing out. >> you look absolutely the part in that dazzling outfit. let me move to anot
in terms of linking education with workforce development. making the united states more economically competitive in the 21st century global economy investing in community colleges, improving the education system and linking that with the business sector. if he can do that, he can leave four years from now with an america with a better economy and much more well positioned for prosperity in the 21st century. >> wait a moment. we have to check in with reporters around the town now. brooke baldwin at the red, white and blue ball. brooke, can you hear me? you are with military leaders and lynyrd skynyrd, i hear. >> you hear correctly, my friend. i can barely hear myself speak and so glad you came to me. i don't know if you can hear. i'm a southern girl. i'm in my perfect place hearing the southern rock band lynyrd skynyrd. playing a significant song. this is "simple man." i was talking to them backstage and they said they sing at concerts all the time. that is hero's red, white and ball here in washington. the men and women of military, many of these guys just in wheelchairs to my right
funds our priorities. it proposes an increase in funding for education. including full-day kindergarten and we fully fund the teachers pension each of the next two years. [applause] education funding represents 64% of our state expenditures. in addition, we provide $18 million over the next few years to ensure that all hoosier workers have the skills that they need to find a job in today's economy. [applause] since i believe that we need new jobs, we are investing nearly $350 million in excess reserves on indiana's roads and bridges and infrastructure of today and tomorrow. [applause] our budget creates a partnership and because indiana is agriculture, we envision our state becoming a hub of agricultural breakthroughs by supporting the development of an agricultural court order. indiana will continue to lead across the midwest and the world. [applause] our budget also ensures that the indiana economic development corporation is adequately equipped to attract more to the hoosier state and to operate with greater transparency and accountability to the public. [applause] lastly, it was abr
, the education. we should have spent less and save more. we should have borrowed a lot less from foreigners. one of the things a lot of people don't get, housing is consumption because people think that they invested in the house they think it's an investment. it's not. we consume a house just like an automobile if you over invest in housing what you are doing is over consuming. so a massive over consumption. it's analogous to the agricultural example. and in that process, we taught millions of people how to do the wrong thing. we taught them how to be mortgage bankers, residential legal attorneys, those millions of people are trying to learn to do something new that is productive and a global economy which is one reason it's been so it difficult to deal with what i imply that. in addition, construction is competitive with manufacturing rates. if you drive of construction wages you try to find a factor in wages which we do with an artificial construction boom and that drew millions of manufacturing jobs overseas to places like india and china. initially the people in india and china didn't know
. that is how we got obamacare, a federal education department, and they drug war. the voters they do something. that's why i wrote my book, "no, they can't." as we begin, what can we do it we disagree with president obama's big government vision? mark meckler and starlee rhoades has some ideas. they have the citizens for self-governance. starlee rhoades is president of the goldwater institute. both say we can return power to the states. what do you mean? start with obamacare. >> state should establish health insurance exchanges. twenty-five states said go right ahead, the policy on your own. you will have to implement it on your own watch. it protects and stops massive subsidies from being paid out from insurance companies and it protects people from being told on by the irs. john: the exchange is a place where you go on the web and it helps you buy an insurance policy. he insurance does that at no cost to the taxpayer. i don't know why it has to be such a big deal or cost so much. >> that is what the federal government will do, and extinction each day. but the thing that is great about that p
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 644 (some duplicates have been removed)